Singapore woodworker

Electric keyboard stand

Just finished a stand for an electric keyboard. It’s made of recycled lumber from a crate, so material cost is less than $10 for some varnish, stain, and sandpaper.

Someone donated a keyboard with a broken stand to the nursing home. My executive director simply asked if I could repair the stand. I couldn’t resist the urge to build a new one.

The vertical post are 4 pieces of lumber glued together with miter joints, the kind that was used in Stickly furniture. The feet of the stand are actually simple boxes. Because of the Stickly design, I am able to threat the wire for the pedals through the hollow post, making the entire thing look a little neater.

As I said, the wood came from a crate. This explains the large number of knots in pine, but it adds character.

This stand was dyed elbony and finished with 5 coats of rubbing varnish. The patients I was working with learned how to make wooden pegs, peg screw holes and trim them flush, sanding, dye the wood and use rub on varnish.

 

 

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Creative marbling machine prototype

There are many marbling machines on the internet. Most of them are table top. Shawn Yeo, who founded VINCO, an educational company that specializes in  creating environments that develop students to be independent learners, leaders and thinkers through tinkering approached me for this project.

Shawn explained the project to me enthusiastically. He wanted a marbling kit which could be attached to a whiteboard via a magnet. A marbling machine allows a marble to go through a set of obstacles, making a little noise in the process. They are also very interesting to watch.

The challenge of this project is the very very thin pieces. There are a lot of parts that are only 3mm thick.

Wave like wooden structure

This wave like structure was interesting to make. The shape was first cut on a scroll saw before being glued together so that the front and back are identical.

Diagram showing 2 grooves routed on a back of a maze like obstacle.

These 2 grooves are where the magnet will sit in.

Maze like structure

Parts were individually cut before gluing it all together with wood glue. Realised that the trick to doing 3mm cuts on a table saw is to cut on the other side, not between the blade and the fence.

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With the circular part only 3mm thick, it was a feat to cut. The trick, use a very slow speed, <500rpm on a drill press. I did spoil quite a number of them before getting it right.

Triangle shaped block with grooves on each side.

The triangle has a drain on each side.
Note the very thin front.

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This was quite interesting to make.I had to drill the hole at exactly the correct spot, then shape the rounded top on the router table.

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End Grain Pop Cake Holder by a Woodworker in Singapore

A friend of mine wanted to make pop cakes for her department year end party. She thus needed a pop cake stand. She searched the web and found a simple stand costing $50. It was a simple block of wood with holes and then spray painted white. She sent me a link and asked if I could replicate it.

“Of course I can, but why would I?” was my instant reply. So I designed a one that I could call my own design, taking inspiration from the end grain cutting board.

The main board was made from the end grains of pine wood. This is frame with a teak border. Lengthwise, the teak border sits in a dovetail groove. This gives it space to expand and contract as wood naturally does. The ends tongue and grooved and held together with spots of glue and panel pins which hold them in place but still give them sufficient space to expand and contract.

So there it is. An end grain pop cake holder. I hope she likes it.
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Greene and Greene inspired coffee table in Singapore

Like the grain

Nice grain of wood under strong light.

Table top grain

Grain of wood under normal light conditions

Isometric view

The table

Coffee table

Front view

Side view

Side view

Drawer open

The drawer glides on two rails on its bottom

Drawer

Proud finger joints of the drawer

Front view

Floating shelf below

Through tennon

Throught mortise joint

Cloud lift

The cloud lifts upwards.

Breadboard end spine

Spines follows curves of the breadboard.

Breadboard end pegs

Breadboard end pegged with white oak. Note the through tennons of the rails.

Handle carved out of white oak

Handle made from white oak

This coffee table was inspired by the Gamble’s house Side table. In the original piece, the legs are thicker, and the cloud lift of the rail under the drawer is positively downwards. In my piece, the legs are more slender from the front and the cloud lift of the rail under the drawer is negatively upwards. I also have a shelf under the table.

The table is made from Kapur wood which is THE wood for door frames and window still. The top measures 90cm by 45cm. It is held flat by breadboard ends. The pegs are white oak which I think give a good contrast from the brown Kapur wood. Of course I could stain it black but I’ll leave it white for now It’ll probably age to a nice lighter brown.

The bottom shelf is made the same way. Notice that there is a gap all round the sides of the bottom shelf. It kind of gives the feel that the shelf is floating, at least that’s the intent. The shelf is actually secured to two sticks joining both lower rails together.

The legs are of similar shape to the Gamble’s side table. The side rails are held in by mortise and tenon joinery. Maybe I should have pegged those for an improved look, but maybe not; best to keep things simple especially for my first attempt at a Greene and Greene inspired coffee table.

The rails are joined to the sides with through mortise and tenon joints. The end of the tenon and mortises are rounded to give that soft feminine finish usually seen in G&G furniture. These are supposed to be the functional decorations for the sides.

The drawer r using proud finger joints.

Comments are welcome and appreciated.